Steven Bullock

Global Head of Research

Steve leads Trucost’s Global ESG Analytics and Client Delivery Team providing essential data and insights to financial institutions, corporate and other clients so that they can allocate capital to more sustainable business models and communicate ESG performance to their stakeholders. He is also part of Trucost’s senior management team.

Steve was Trucost’s lead on the world’s first public environmental profit and loss “EP&L” account for PUMA and led the technical development of the Water Risk Monetizer (in collaboration with Ecolab and Microsoft). More recently, Steve contributed to the technical development of the S&P Global Ratings Green Evaluation tool and the S&P 500 Carbon Price Risk 2030 Adjusted Index. Steve sits on the Advisory Panel of the Natural Capital Coalition having previously led the development of the Natural Capital Protocol’s food and beverage and apparel sector guides.

Prior to joining Trucost, Steve worked as an analyst for a performance management consultancy. He holds a BA 1:1 with honours in Geography and a MSc with Distinction in Sustainable Development from the University of Exeter.

Traditional approaches to the measurement of environmental impacts provide a variety of metrics - but valuing environmental parameters in financial terms provides an overarching common metric for the assessment of environmental impact or benefit.

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Here we explain how we have further developed Trucost's research process to improve transparency and meet the evolving needs of Trucost's stakeholders.

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Water use has risen at more than twice the rate of population growth in the last century, according to the World Resources Institute (WRI). The risk of peak water becoming the "new oil" is putting water scarcity on the agendas of many companies.

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Trucost applied World Bank commodity prices to data on estimated coal and oil use in the operations and supply chains of companies in the FTSE 350 Index in 2009/10. Findings show that costs for the carbon-intensive fossil fuels could amount to almost US$350 billion across the Index.

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